Episode 3

full
Published on:

10th Mar 2022

S1E3 Code of Honor: The One in Which Star Trek Does a Racism

Star Trek: The Next Generation analysis of season 1 episode 3 (Code of Honor)

The focus of today's show is (arguably) the most notorious Star Trek episode of any series, an episode so overtly racist that the director of it was fired DURING production. In the '80s.

Mike and Nic do their whitest best to analyze the harmful themes presented within while tying specific scenes, dialogue, wardrobe choices in the episode to their white supremacist colonialist roots via conversations about anthropology, museums, Orientalism, and more.

We also note the white-feminism-via-the-male-gaze undercurrent running throughout the episode. While Tasha Yar is (yet again) objectified, she also objectifies; her role is instrumental to the racist narrative. She is white woman kidnapped, and also 'girl boss' warrior who can fight her own fights. She is victim and victor and prize.

Nic includes a bunch of trivia about this particular episode in this one, including what cast members and fans think of it. Her favorite resources linked below (read the comments!):

References

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About the Podcast

Redshirt Collective
A Star Trek: The Next Generation Watch-Along Podcast!
Join Nic and Mike as we boldly go...through every single episode of Star Trek: The Next Generation! We post every other Thursday, covering one episode of TNG in each episode of the podcast, giving our takes as radical leftists and connecting themes in the show to our personal experiences.

Looking to create a welcoming space for all those in the fandom that are usually kept at the margins; we want our comrades from around the world to laugh and rage along with us as we analyze a show that functioned as dangerous heteronormative neocolonial propaganda, but also as a heartwarming attempt to find humanity, tenderness and curiosity within ourselves. Welcome aboard, comrade!
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